data security

Google ramps up G Suite security console

Google recently announced a new security feature – OAuth apps whitelisting, for its G Suite customers. The feature will provide better visibility and power in hands of the customers, allowing them to define how their data is being used by third-party apps. Google added the feature into its G Suite security controls with an effort to improve the data access permissions and protect user data from any phishing attacks. A few months back, Gmail users were hit by a phishing scam, consisting an email claiming to be an invite for Google Docs. Though actually, it was a hideous act to prompt users to give access permissions to the third-party apps to use their personal data. With the new feature, Google tries to prevent such phishing attacks in future by ensuring better security level for the users...

Peak 10 and StillSecure To Host Webinar On 2013 PCI DSS Compliance Standards on April 24th

Peak 10 Inc., an IT infrastructure and cloud solutions provider  will host a gratis webinar on how to best protect sensitive data in the cloud to meet new Payment Card Industry Data Security Standards (PCI DSS). The online event will be held Wednesday, April 24, 2013 at 11:30 a.m. EDT. The registration for the webinar can be done here. Experts from Peak 10, a leading cloud solutions provider, and StillSecure®, a  managed security services firm, will look at how recent updates to PCI DSS address the challenges of virtualized infrastructure, rogue wireless access detection, mobile payments and other issues. Topics will include: An overview of PCI compliance requirements PCI compliance responsibilities (of the business and the cloud provider) Compliance challenges posed by new technologies, g...

Hackers Taking Advantage of Lack of Encrypting Knowledge

DAILYHOSTNEWS, October 23, 2011 – Despite encrypting databases, small businesses are leaving customer data open to hackers. Research has shown that even long passwords can be cracked in a few seconds. Testing by hosting specialist UKFast has revealed that  using  industry-standard hashing algorithm MD5 to protect data still allows for a seven character password (of lower alphabet and numbers) to be cracked in 7 seconds. If a more secure encryption method such as SHA 256, it would take up to seven times longer to brute force crack the same password. The tests call into question the security of customer data stored by SMEs, who often do not have the luxury of in-house IT teams or the technical knowledge to properly secure their customer databases. In his remarks, Neil Lathwood, technical dir...

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